Diamond

Diamond came to us together with her mom Royal (a papered quarter horse) as a 2 month old foal. Royal was brought to an auction very pregnant and would have been bought by a meat buyer if Bear Valley Rescue had not stepped in. Thinking about it, Diamond would have probably been born at a feedlot and died within a short time. Or slaughtered as horse veal.

Diamond was born within 2 weeks after arrival at Bear Valley Rescue and was named Diamond because of the little diamond she has on the side of her neck. Her birth went very quick thanks to the experienced mom (she used to be a broodmare for 6 years) and Diamond was a healthy foal.

I decided to foster them because that way my foal Cornelia could grow up with a playmate instead of with a couple of older mares and grumpy geldings. And it  is also better for their mental development. It’s kind of like having a child grow up with a couple of grandparents without the contact of children who are the same age. Of course they will grow up anyway but it’s better for their mindset to be with other kids. Same for horses.

Because Diamond was a foal other people started to be interested in her, to adopt her so I decided to adopt her myself so the two of them could stay together. And I am also a sucker for not wanting to take them apart. Just hate to see horse looking for each other for weeks. Calling out for eachother.

Now they can stay together till the day they die and I have an extra horse to ride in the future. Although she will probably be way better in barrel racing then dressage. And in that case we have to find somebody who likes to ride her, because I am too old for that kind of fast-paced sport :-).

Diamonds’ character is great. She is very sweet and easy to handle except with her legs. Two summers ago she got stuck in the barbed wire and ripped open her hind leg. Good thing it was old wire because it broke and didn’t rip her tendons too but is was close. Yes, I am replacing all the barb wire and keep them away from the parts I haven’t replaced yet with electric fence. Unfortunately my mare Gracia has a very high pain level and doesn’t care at all about the shocks she gets. The grass on the other side is greener so she just goes through it. Almost every day I am repairing and replacing the lines.

So her legs are a big no no for people. I had to be very careful to keep the wound clean and twice the vet had to come to sedate her for a big clean up. After weeks the wounds were healed but her idea that we would do something to her legs not. Despite the many touches of her leg she still doesn’t allow it. Lifting her front feed just ends up in her dropping on her knees to get out of my grip.

But we will succeed one day. And then she can finally have a good trim by our farrier.

For now we keep trying and she also will start her training this summer so it will come. She will be one of these golden pony when older which can be handled by everybody even small children.

 

Email: info@whyoils.ca / Facebook WhyOilsCanada / Website:www.whyoils.ca

Advertisements

Bear Valley Rescue

Bear Valley Rescue is a registered rescue located just south of Sundre, north of Cochrane. They preliminary rescue horses but also pigs, goats, chickens, rabbits and more.

A couple of years ago I heard about them when I was looking for a reliable place where my horses could go in case something happened to me. I liked what I saw and after a year or two I started to do some things for this organization. I noticed that not a lot of people were familiar with Bear Valley so I went for the “raising awareness” challenge by signing up for some  local fairs, handing out brochures at a couple of pet and horse stores and I arranged a weekly pick up of the left over bread and sweets from our local bakery Cobs. At the end of the day all the left overs will be thrown out. Some days of the week schools and other organizations pick up the bread but not all days. Together with a volunteer also living in Cochrane we pick up and deliver the bread to Bear Valley. As Kathy, the owner of the rescue said, it saves her at least $50 dollar a month if not more. That money can now be used for other things like medicines and feed for the other animals. I also put aside money from my sales to donate. And that should be more and more over the next months and years.

Bear Valley is also the place where two of my horses came from. Royal and Diamond, mom and daughter came to us almost 4 years ago. Meanwhile I adopted Diamond (the foal) and mom just never left and is a permanent foster. And as long as I am able to take care of her she can stay.

If you are a horse or an animal lover and like to know more about them please visit their website (www.bearvalleyab.org) or find them on Facebook. They are always looking for donations (money-wise or tack or feed or …), sponsors, fosters or adopters and volunteers. They also have auctions on regular basis or other fun things.

Unfortunately the stream of animals coming to Bear Valley will never end. Take care of your animals please. Think about what it will cost you not only short-term but also long-term.

Choosing an animal is choosing responsibility. You don’t get rid of your child after a couple of years, right? Try to think the same about your pet. Way too much horses are shipped to the slaughterhouses (the faith 5 of my horses were waiting for), too much dogs and cats are put down.

Just an (occasional) side step from essential oils and my business but for me also important.

Website www.whyoils.ca/Facebook Why Oils Canada/info@whyoils.ca